Institute of World Culture
Theme for 2008
Imaginative Use of Spiritual, Mental and Material Resources 

Click here for a printer-friendly version of 2008 program
_________________________________________
Essay on the Theme:
As the worldwide circulation of ideas germane to an emerging world culture flourishes, one might ask what can be done to promote more concretely the use of ideas in the service of universal welfare. Is there not too much deprivation and suffering around the globe to merely talk about ideas of universal unity and causation (interdependence)? Imaginative use of resources offers both a moral and a practical path for building a world of plentitude where poverty now (apparently) prevails. The challenge is not a quantitative scarcity as much as poverty of imagination. Resources are boundless in potentia. The task is to discover the rich layers of spiritual, mental and material resources constituting the cosmos (universe of life) and give shape to their ethical, transformative and self-sustaining use. Resources might be seen as sacred in origin even for those who don’t believe in a creation story. Resources give life and sustain a multitude of creative and intelligent activities by life forms. While the natural world appears guided by ancient sources of intelligence, human beings demonstrate a great capacity for obscuring what is intelligible with the delusions of ignorant selfishness. Can we not improve our clarity of thought and motivation? Is not the first step to discovering the plentitude of resources a step of self-discovery? Spiritual and mental resources may seem shrouded in invisibility and difficult to actively utilize. Yet small, immediate commitments may engage us in constructive experiments for the sake of universal welfare. In the popular novel by Herman Hesse, Siddhartha, the seeker representing the life search of the Buddha was challenged by a wealthy courtesan: What did he have to offer? His answer was both immediate and timeless in application: “I can think, I can fast and I can wait.” Who cannot make some modest use of these self-directed disciplines that contain seeds of insightful responses to many of the controversial and excessive uses of material resources?

There is nothing small about the recognition that we live on the planet Earth with well over six billion human beings and billions upon billions of other centers of life and consciousness. A very big breath is needed to absorb this cosmic fact. Recognition of the interdependence of life enables us to investigate the use of resources with greater scientific effectiveness. Who could have imagined forty years ago that various household spray cans could contribute to a hole in the earth’s protective cover? What other “inconvenient truths” could we respond to if we truly cared about the well being of all the life forms with whom we share the spaceship earth? Our immediate goal in investigating the use of resources may be very instrumental. A broader, more inclusive and deeper level of inquiry may nurture the intellectual and moral growth of individuals serving within healthy, self-sustaining communities.

Spiritual teachers remind us of ethical principles such as universal brotherhood, cooperation and non-violence. Without the application of such principles, our knowledge acquired about the practical use of resources may be misapplied and even destructive. Long-term sustainability is only possible if there is balance built into the use of a resource. Balance, as the sages have long taught, is rooted in moral balance however reflected in natural, psychological or social harmony. Inner balance enables both creative change and self-sustaining persistence. A great variety of programs this year at the Institute of World Culture will explore the challenge of initiating transformative change based on both knowledge and ethical commitment in relation to a very complex social and natural environment.

Dr. Carolyn Dorrance, President, Institute of World Culture


Program for 2008

_______________________________
Seminar
What is True Wealth?
Saturday, January 19, 2008
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speakers: Drs. James Tepfer and Mary Jacob

What is true wealth? What are the possible meanings of ‘wealth’? What is the relationship between ‘inner wealth’ and ‘common wealth’? Why doesn’t material wealth bring more lasting solutions to conditions of poverty? How does the relationship of human life to the natural world determine the wealth or poverty of a society? What insights or principles do exemplars of non-violent service, such as M. K. Gandhi or 2004 Nobel Peace prize winner, Wangari Maathai, use to promote true wealth? What do people from different cultural backgrounds value as wealth? How do attitudes toward the environment, cultural practices, and the role of gender shape values and practices regarding wealth?  What are the problems or possibilities that global interdependence offers for reducing poverty and promoting wealth? These and other questions will be the focus of the opening seminar for the 2008 program presented by Dr. James Tepfer and Dr. Mary Jaob. Contributions from seminar participants welcome.

Click here for a copy of Dr. Tepfer's talk
Click here for a biography of Dr. Jacob
Click here for a biography of Dr. Tepfer
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Excursion
Asia Pacific Museum and the Norton Simon Museum

Friday, January 25, 2008
1:00 pm  Depart Santa Barbara for Los Angeles
7:00 pm  Lecture at the Norton Simon
Meet at Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Coordinator: Dr. Carolyn Dorrance

Visits to the Asia Pacific Museum and the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena will include viewing of three special exhibits: Rainbow Colors: Woodblock Prints of Paul Jacoulet; Rank and Style: Power Dressing in Imperial China; and Tales of the Blue Lord.  The excursion will include a special illustrated lecture from 7–8pm on The Life of Krishna by the curator of the Norton Simon Museum. For more informaiton, contact Carolyn Dorrance at carolyn@worldculture.org or call 805-967-1055.


Forum
Remembering Mahatma Gandhi
Saturday, February 2 , 2008
4:00 – 6:00 pm 
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Coordinator: Gerry Lewin
Gandhi was “an inspiring example of a genuine inter-faith and inter-civilizational dialogue…. For Gandhi, rational discussion was not just an exchange of arguments but a process of deepening and expanding the consciousness of the participants. When it was conducted in a proper spirit, those involved reconstituted each other’s being and were reborn as a result of the encounter.” 
An observance of the 60th Death Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi will include readings and comments by participants.  Professor Nandini Iyer will offer her observations on Gandhi's legacy.  Other contributions are welcome.  The section on Ahimsa in Politics and Society in Chapter 8 of The Moral and Political Thought of Mahatma Gandhi by Raghavan Iyer offers a timely election perspective. A recording of Gandhi speaking will be played.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends



Film Forum and Live Performance
Othello
Saturday, February 16, 2008
   4:00 – 9:00 pm  
   Film, Dinner and Discussion
   Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
   Watch the Laurence Fishburne version of the movie, dinner ordered in, discuss the film
Saturday Matinee, March 1, 2008 
   2:00 pm    

   PCPA live performance of Othello
   Alan Hancock College, Santa Maria
Coordinator: Dr. Judy Saltzman
Passion, jealousy and revenge ignite William Shakespeare's Othello into a searing tragedy of love and paradox. The collision of Moore and Venetia, war and love, youth and age, infidelity and loyalty. European and African are the backdrop against which Othello and Desdemona pursue their love and Iago conducts his campaign of destruction and manipulation. As gripping and poignant today as when it was written, this play's tantalizing poetry and unblinking humanity gives it a rightful place in the heart's core of great dramas.
For more information on the live performance:  http://www.pcpa.org/othello.html

Email judy@worldculture.org or call 805-528-3008 for more information about carpooling and tickets.
Click here for an editorial article on "Why Shakespeare?"



Seminar
Traditional Chinese Medicine
Saturday, February 23, 2008
2:00 – 4:30 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speaker: Gayatri Chora Heesen


Gayatri Chora Hessen, a well-known, local, licensed acupuncturist and teacher of Chinese medicine will present some key aspects of the tranditional healing practices that draw on energy and its balanced flow throught the human body.  Acupuncture is an ancient method of healing which pre-dates recorded history.  As part of Traditional Chinese Medicine, it has become established as an effective healing modality that can restore and maintain health.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Lecture
Promoting Democracy & Social Justice around the World
Saturday, March 1, 2008
8:00 – 10:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speaker: Dr. Leo Gabriel

Dr. Leo Gabriel is a leading voice in the World Social Forum and other global projects for progressive reform.  As a researcher, journalist, published author, university professor, political activist and candidate for the European Parliament, Dr. Gabriel has lived the life of a global citizen. He has particpated in numerous projects promoting democracy and social justice around the world. Upsurge in Latin America – the Politics of Social Movements (2007), his latest book, describes efforts to develop independent civil societies in the region. Time for questions and answers will be included. Call 966-3941 for more information. Suggested donation: $5.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Lecture
The Vision of Sustainable Urbanism and the Future of Santa Barbara
Saturday, March 15, 2008
10:30 am – 12:00 noon
Victoria Hall Theater, 33 West Victoria Street, Santa Barbara
Speaker: Stefanos Polyzoides

How can Santa Barbara's General Plan be updated to promote the city's evolution towards a more sustainable and humane built environment while growing its physical character, economy, architectural and other traditions as well as the cherished ways of life it provides for its residents and visitors? Stephanos Polyzoides, urbanist, architect and educator, has been one of the foremost contemporary voices advocating and practicing sustainable town planning. He will provide an exploration of the principles and current applications of some of the key concepts of New Urbanism: Connectivity, Place-specificity, Compactness, Diversity and Frugality. As co-founders of the Congress for New Urbanism, Moule & Polyzoides has a long history of architecture and urbanism projects that are informed by a respect for understanding of architectural history and regional building traditions, consideration of existing urban settings, respect for the functional and spiritual purposes of architecture, and sensitivity to place and the fragility of natural ecosystems. In all these ways, our projects reduce energy consumption levels at the neighborhood and urban scales.
Though it has been widely established that approximately 48% of CO2 emissions are produced by buildings (primarily in the form of their heating and cooling needs), it is also true that another third is spent transporting people and goods to and from those buildings. That is, even if an individual building is "carbon neutral" thereby generating all its own energy needs through new technologies, if it is not located in an integrated urban fabric in which walking, bicycling and public transport is a viable option, many believe it cannot be considered truly “green” or “sustainable.” Sustainable Urbanism is a return to a European and ancient model of neighborhood planning, city design and land use. It undertakes to confront one of the greatest public challenges of our time: reversing or reforming the basic conceptual framework of city and neighborhood Master Planning to encourage the reduction or elimination of dependence upon the automobile, to return safe streets to the pedestrian and bicyclist, to preserve open spaces, natural resources, human and environmental health and to foster a more integrated and meaningful sense of community through reformation of the built environment. Venice and Copenhagen are the most well known contemporary examples of very successful urban centers offering a high quality of life due to the whole-hearted adoption of these principles. The City of Santa Barbara is in the process of preparing to update the City's General Plan. With that update is the opportunity to revise the land use model, zoning laws, circulation and transportation guidelines that can either stultify or greatly enhance progress towards a built environment that is truly sustainable. Stephanos Polyzoides, one of the foremost contemporary voices advocating Sustainable Urbanism will share his vision and insight as to how our city may truly evolve toward a greener and healthier future for all. For more information on the lecture, contact Kirk Gradin at 805-564-4423 or kirk@banyan-architects.com
Co-sponsored by: The Institute of World Culture, The Sustainability Project, Santa Barbara Contractors Association, Community Environmental Council, the U.S. Green Building Council, Santa Barbara Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Council for Sustainable Transportation
Click here for more information on the topic
Click here for biographical information on Mr. Polyzoides
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Film Forum
The Sand Castle: Building
a City in the Desert of Ras al-Khaimah

Saturday, March 29, 2008
7:30 – 9:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Host: Robert Moore
WIDE ANGLE travels to the royal headquarters of the United Arab Emirate of Ras al-Khaimah as HH Sheikh Saud solicits top European architects to carry out his plans for a new capital city in the middle of his desert kingdom. The documentary follows a Norwegian architectural firm as it makes its bid to design the capital's master plan, immersing viewers inside an unfolding drama in which agents of East and West struggle to arrive at an architectural vision both worlds can embrace -- and one that will ultimately fulfill a Sheikh's bold dreams. Join us for a showing of the film with discussion to follow. (57 minutes)
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends



Seminar
Can Civil Society Prevail?
Reports from Europe, Kosovo, Iran and Other Nations

Saturday, April 5, 2008
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Panalists: UCSB Global Studies Graduate Students
Many global and local social change initiatives are being conducted that escape or are distorted by news media sound btyes. UCSB Global Studies graduate students will offer us glimpses from many parts of the world about how civil society initiatives are enhancing human well-being despite challenges of the status quo. Question and answer dialogue will follow the presentations.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Seminar and Public Lectures
Vandana Shiva
Speaker: Dr. Vandana Shiva
Dr. Shiva, a global campaigner for a sustainable planet and recipient of the Right Livelihood Award, will be making three appearances in Santa Barbara.  These events are sponsored by the Santa Barbara Ecological Education Coalition, of which ithe Institute of World Culture is a member.  All appearances by Dr. Siva are open to the public, however, reservations are required for the seminar on Saturday afternoon and a $10 charge will be charged at the door.  Please note: each event is at a different location in Santa Barbara.  Detailed information on each event is below:
Friday, April 25, 2008
   Talk:  Recreating the Commons in a Globalized World
    4:00 – 5:00 pm
    UCSB Student Resources Building, UC Santa Barbara
    Dr. Shiva will give a short talk and then participate in a dialogue with UCSB faculty and students. This
    event is free and open to the public. No reservations are required.  Exact change will be needed in order
    to park on campus. The UCSB Student Resources Building is located between Humanities Building, the
    Events Center and the Faculty Club at UCSB. Park in Faculty Club or Events Center lot. For more
    information, contact: B.J. Danetra, email: bjdanetra@bren.ucsb.edu
Saturday, April 26, 2008
   Seminar:  Recreating the Commons
    2:00 – 5:00 pm
    Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
    Dr. Siva will speak about reclaiming the commons and give examples of her current work.
    Members only/Reservations Required/Cost $10.  Please contact Carolyn Dorrance to make your
    reservation by calling 967-1055.
Saturday, April 26, 2008
    Lecture:  Peace, Justice and Sustainability
    7:30 pm
    Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library, 40 East Anapamu, Santa Barbara
    Dr. Siva will give a talk, followed by discussion, on the topic of peace, justice and sustainability. This event
    is free and open to the public. No reservations are required. Contact: Philip Grant for more information: email:
    grantp45@hotmail.com
Special thanks to the following donors: The UCSB Bren School, The Santa Barbara City College Center for Sustainability, The W. H. Capps Foundation, The Institute of World Culture, La Casa de Maria Retreat Center, The Institute of Reverential Ecology.
Click here for biographical information
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Seminar and Dance Presentations
Hawaiian Spirituality, Ecology and Dance
 
Friday, May 16, 2008
7:30 – 9:30 pm
Dance Performance: Hi'iaka: Journey of a Goddess
   Victoria Hall Theater, 33 West Victoria Street, Santa Barbara
  
$20 General Admission, $10 Students/Seniors (cash only)
  
Kumu Hula (Hula Master) Kehaulani Kekua of the Traditional Hula School of the island of Kaua'i: Halau
   Palaihiwa O Kaipuwai, with her lead male and female dancers, will delight us with an evening of
   dance, storytelling and chanting inspired by the epic tale of Pele, goddess of fire and volcanoes.
Saturday, May 17, 2008
1:00 – 4:00 pm

   Dance-illustrated Seminar: Unveiling the Kumulipo
   Institute of World Culture, Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
   Speaker: Kehaulani Kekua
   Unfolding of the epic Hawaiian Chant of Creation: the Kumulipo. Free. Seating limited. Pre-registration
   recommended.  For more information: 805/455-9552 or 808/864-0495 or email renee@worldculture.org.
7:30 – 9:30 pm
   Lecture Demonstration: Laka is the Forest, Hula and the Environment
   Santa Barbara City College, Fe Bland Forum, West Campus
   $15 General Admission, $5 Students/Seniors (cash only)
   A glimpse into the transmission of Hawaiian cultural knowledge passed from master to pupil in a
   traditional school of Hula.  Honoring of the native environment is key. Special dances and chants will
   illustrate the presentation. For more information: 805/455-9552 or 808/864-0495 or email
   renee@worldculture.org.
 Additional workshops and classes: Friday, May 16, Sunday, May 18, Monday, May 18, 2008
   Hula Classes and workshops with Kumu Kehaulani Kekua.
For more information, to arrange for tickets, or to register for classes and workshps:
call 805/455-9552 or 808/864-0495 or email renee@worldculture.org.
Click here for printer-friendly brochure with more detailed information
Click here for printer-friendly flyer for sharing with friends or for posting (legal size paper)
Click here for a biography of Kumu Kehaulani Kekua


Film and Discussion
Nuclear Weapons and the Human Future

Saturday, May 31, 2008
7:30 – 9:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Host: Frank Kelly                                            
This very short film, produced by the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, documents the alarming danger of nuclear weapons and suggests the options for humanity. Discussion will follow.


Seminar
Religious Views of Sacred Places in India

Saturday, June 7, 2008
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speaker: Professor Knut Jacobsen

An illustrated explanation of the salvific power of sacred places according to Hindu traditions will be presented by Knut A. Jacobsen, Professor in Religious Studies at the University of Bergen, Norway and visiting scholar at University of California at Santa Barbara. Professor Jacobsen is the author or editor of 15 books and more than 60 articles in journals and collected editions focusing on various aspects on religions in South Asia and in the South Asian diasporas. In his lecture, Professor Jacobsen will explain how pilgrimages to what are believed to be sacred places are experienced as a salvific resource in the Hindu traditions. According to Hinduism, especially in the traditions represented in the Mahabharata and the Puranas and according to numerous local traditions of Hindu sacred places, presence at sacred places is in itself a method to attain the highest salvific goal of religion, moksha. Salvation is in this tradition of sacred places presented as something quite easily accessible and available to all regardless of gender and caste and not prevented by a person's moral impurity, lack of restraint or ignorance. This power of sacred places to grant salvific rewards to all is a significant fact and is not always sufficiently noted in scholarly presentations of Hinduism which often favor more conservative or restrictive traditions.  Opportunity for questions and discussion will follow the presentation. Professor Jacobsen is the author of  Prakrti in Samkhya-Yoga (1999). Recent publications include Kapila: Founder of Samkhya and Avatara of Vishnu (2008), and the edited volumes South Asians in the Diaspora: Histories and Religious Traditions (2004) (with P. Pratap Kumar), Theory and Practice of Yoga: Essays in Honour of Gerald James Larson (2005) and South Asian Religions on Display: Religious Processions in South Asia and in the Diaspora (2008). He is currently working on a book on Hindu pilgrimage traditions. Contact carolyn@worldculture.org or call 967-1055 for more information.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Benefit Concert
Traditional Indonesian Music and Dance:
A Concert to Benefit Indonesian Artists
Saturday, June 14th
2:00 – 4:00 pm
Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library, 40 East Anapamu, Santa Barbara
Host: Richard North, Director of Gamelan Sinar Surya of Santa Barbara
The ancient and beautiful music and dance traditions of Indonesia are facing extinction under threat from globalization and economic pressures. The younger generation of Indonesian artists is aware of the fragility of their heritage, and has asked for help in documenting and preserving their precious cultural legacy. All funds received will go to the purchase of video and other equipment necessary for this endeavor. Come listen and enjoy--Donations welcome! Thank you for your help. For more information: 805-895-0592, or www.GamelanSB.com and www.CirebonArts.com
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Film and Discussion
Salt of the Earth
Saturday, June 28 , 2008
7:30 pm
Concord House,
1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Host: Robert Moore
"No American film is more inspiring and emotionally satisfying than this remarkable 1954 film."
                              – Danny Peary, Film Critic
A historic struggle by Mexican-American mine workers for fair wages and justice turns into a larger quest for American ideals of freedom, equality and self-definition. Salt of the Earth (1954) is an American drama film written by Michael Wilson, directed by Herbert J. Biberman, and produced by Paul Jarrico. The only U.S. black-listed film. Time for discussion after the film.

Click here for a printer-friendly flyer



Founding Day Lecture
Paradigms for a Sustainable Life on Earth :
Linking Biology and Religion with Interspiritualilty
Saturday, July 5, 2008
7:30 – 9:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speaker: Dr. Ed Bastian

This presentation will explore the connection between spirituality and the environment and how human spiritualilty is a force for sustainability, including the positive emergence of biodiversity and interspirituality as the grounding for new paradigms for sustaining life on Earth.  There will be a brief presentation and a lively discussion on a number of themes, including interconnecting movements in biology and religion. In biology, the movement from systematics to ecology to biodiversity. In religion, the movement from secular, to ecumenical, to interfaith, to interspiritual and interspirituality as a hopeful new paradigm for human-nature flourishing. The speaker, Ed Bastian, holds a Ph.D. in Buddhist Studies. He directed the first biodiversity program at the Smithsonian, produced a series of filsm for the BBC and PBS, founded the Spiritual Paths Institute and is working with Santa Barbara faith communities to build ECOFaith Santa Barbara.
Click here for further biographical information on Ed Bastian
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friend


Film
2008 Film Series and Discussion
Saturdays in July at 7:00 pm                               
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

Host: Robert Moore

July 12
Orlando (1992)
Director Sally Potter adapts Virginia Woolf's 1928 allegorical novel about a woman, Orlando, who lives for 400 years.  Commanded never to age by Queen Elizabeth, the title character becomes immortal; we then follow Orlando through 400 years of dreamlike British history. Midway through the film, Orlando changes genders.

July 19
500 Nations (1995) Episodes 1 & 2
500 Nations utilizes historical texts, eyewitness accounts, pictorial sources and computer graphic reconstructions to explore the magnificent civilizations which flourished prior to contact with Western civilization, and to tell the dramatic and tragic story of the Native American nations' desperate attempts to retain their way of life against overwhelming odds.
Episode 1: The Splendor of the Anasazi and Maya
Episode 2: Teotihuacan, Aztecs, Motecuhzoma & Cortez

July 26
A Man for All Seasons (1966)
Winner of six academy awards, the movie depicts the historical standoff between Sir Thomas More (Oscar winner Paul Scofield) and King Henry VIII (Robert Shaw) concerning the King’s recent divorce and new marriage. A dramatic portrayal of how a rational human being can remain true to his principles in the face of seemingly overwhelming adversity.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer


Multi-media Presentation and Potluck
Days of Wonder: India and Nepal 2008
Saturday, August 16, 2008
6:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speaker: Sandhya Tillotson
Make a virtual journey to the Subcontinent with Sandhya Tillotson, a 21-year-old, blue-eyed college  student with an Indian name.  Take in the mystery of South India’s temples, the dry sweep of the Thar desert, the snowy vistas of Annapurna.   Hear the wise words of the village elders in the Gandhian-based nonprofit group she volunteered for in Rajasthan.  Imagine ‘surfing the soil’ with Sandhya plowing a field in Vandana Shiva’s progressive, beyond-organic farm.  Participate in the wonder of a young visitor in an ancient land. Kindly RSVP Renée Tillotson (808) 864-0495 or renee@worldculture.org with your potluck offering.  Alternatively, you may choose to contribute monetarily towards an order of Indian dishes from a local restaurant.
Click here for additional information on this presentation
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends



Seminar with Filmed Interview
Keepers of Their Place: Towards a Sustainable Urbanism

Saturday, September 13, 2008
2:30 – 5:00 pm
Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Speakers: Kirk Gradin and Russ Lewin
An in-depth, private interview with architect and urban planner, Stephanos Polyzoides that was filmed at the Institute of World Culture earlier this year.  The discussion includes several relevant topics surrounding the principles of 'sustainable urbanism.'
* How might the urban planning and design process be revolutionized to more faithfully contribute to a "sustainable", vibrant and democratic city fabric?
* How might neighborhood design principles assist in relieving the problems of continued sprawl, environmental degradation and pollution, personal isolation, financial exclusivity and the erosion of civic connectivity?
* The city of Santa Barbara is featured as both an exemplary model and a conflicted system in need of major reforms, if it intends to continue to approach the ideal of urban sustainability.
An open discussion will follow the film. For more information: 805\963-6007.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends
Click here for biographical information
                        


Annual Member Meeting
Brainstorming the 2009 Program
Saturday, October 11, 2008
7:00 – 9:00 pm
Concord House: 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

Following the annual Membership meeting, we will brainstorm the Institute’s 2009 Program. A letter and questionnaire inviting you to share ideas for next year’s program can be found through the links below. The theme of the year will be related to Aim 5, To deepen awareness of the universality of man’s spiritual striving and its rich variety of expression in the religions, philosophies and literatures of humanity.
Aim # 5 in the Declaration of Interdependence
Click here for a letter from the IWC Board
Click here for Suggestion Form




Seminar
Challenging Poverty in Latin America with Liberation Theology
Saturday, October 25, 2008
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House: 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

Speaker: Dr. Kevin Fagan
Dr. Kevin Fagan, Professor at Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo, a scholar in Latin American studies, and a long-time resident of Chile, will explore the historical roots and contemporary applications of Liberation Theology. He will explain the philosophical foundations of "orthopraxis" and describe examples of political movements that illustrate the dynamic effort to link Christian values with challenges to injustice and poverty by empowering the poor, the priest and the politician.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends


Book Forum
Mountains Beyond Mountains
Saturday, November 1, 2008
4:00 – 6:00 pm
Concord House: 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

Speaker: Dr. Jerry Pike
Dr. Jerry Pike will be leading a discussion of Tracy Kidder's Mountains Beyond Mountains, which chronicles the ongoing efforts of Dr. Paul Farmer, a visionary physician from Harvard who works globally to fight infectious diseases, particularly TB. Dr. Farmer offers a new paradigm for addressing social change, illustrating how fighting disease means fighting social inequities and how we are all one when it comes to pandemics. The discussion will focus on key points of Dr. Farmer's philosophy, its connection to liberation theology, and how we may begin to answer the question, "What are we to do with this remarkable but daunting information presented in Mountains Beyond Mountains?"  Participants in the Forum are encouraged to read at least part of the book before the meeting.

Tracy Kidder describes Paul Farmer:
"He worked extraordinary hours. In fact, I don’t think he sleeps more than an hour or two most nights. Here was a person who seemed to be practicing more than he preached, who seemed to be living, as nearly as any human being can, without hypocrisy. A challenging person, the kind of person whose example can irritate you by making you feel you’ve never done anything as important, and yet, in his presence, those kinds of feelings tended to vanish. In the past, when I’d imagined a person with credentials like his, I’d imagined someone dour and self-righteous, but he was very friendly and irreverent, and quite funny. He seemed like someone I’d like to know, and I thought that if I did my job well, a reader would feel that way, too." (excerpted from www.thereaderscircle.com)
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends



Seminar
Creating our Environmental Future:
Using Imagination and Intelligence for Planetary Survival

Monday, November 24, 2008
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 pm
Location: The Karpeles Manuscript Library, 21 West Anapamu St., Santa Barbara

Speaker: Dr. Ernst von Weizsäcker
Dr. Ernst von Weizsäcker, Dean of the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara,
will lecture on creating our environmental future. Research findings offered by a team of engineers and designers committed to environmental sanity have just been published in a new book, Force, edited by Dr. Weizsäcker. Global warming, labor productivity gains through sustainability, and whole systems construction are some of the topics to be discussed by this pioneer in green thinking, member of the Club of Rome, and former member of the German Parliament.  His other books include Earth Politics and Factor Four.
Please join us at the Institute of World Culture's Concord House, 1407 Chapala Street, for a reception following the lecture.
Co-sponsored by the Santa Barbara Ecological Education Coalition.
For more information: Philip Grant 845-7222
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends



Lecture
Global Inequality, Ecology and the Search for Justice
Wednesday, December 3, 2008
7:00 pm
La Casa de Maria, 800 Bosque Road, Montecito
Speaker: Dr. Wolfgang Sachs
Does living in harmony with natural systems suggest how we might achieve justice and fairness in our relations with each other? Join one of the world's leading eco-philosophers as he explores the link between ethics and sustainable living. In addition to being a Senior Fellow at the Wuppertal Institute, Dr. Sachs a member of the Club of Rome, and author of numerous publications, including Fair Future: Limited Resources and Global Justice, the Development Dictionary and Planet Dialectics.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer for the talk at La Casa de Maria


Seminar

Fair Wealth: Cultural Signposts for a Solar Economy
Saturday, December 6, 2008
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord House: 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

Speaker: Dr. Wolfgang Sachs
Dr. Wolfgang Sachs, Senior Research Fellow at the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy in Germany and member of the Club of Rome, will discuss the requirements of a global commitment to sustainability and fairness in resource development. Dr. Sachs is a prolific writer and much respected active voice in current debates about the impact of globalization and industrial technology. Dr. Sachs is head of the interdisciplinary project on "Globalization and Sustainability" and participated in the "Stock Exchange of Visions" project in 2007.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer for the IWC seminar
Click here for this month's Editorial Essay by Wolfgang Sachs

Lecture
Global Inequality, Ecology and the Search for Justice
Wednesday, December 3, 2008
7:00 pm
La Casa de Maria, 800 Bosque Road, Montecito
Speaker: Dr. Wolfgang Sachs
Does living in harmony with natural systems suggest how we might achieve justice and fairness in our relations with each other? Join one of the world's leading eco-philosophers as he explores the link between ethics and sustainable living. In addition to being a Senior Fellow at the Wuppertal Institute, Dr. Sachs a member of the Club of Rome, and author of numerous publications, including Fair Future: Limited Resources and Global Justice, the Development Dictionary and Planet Dialectics.
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer for the talk at La Casa de Maria



Reception
Seasonal Celebration

Saturday, December 20, 2008
Time: 7:30 – 9:30 pm
Concord House: 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara

Join in a seasonal celebration of the solstice and other holiday observances. Sing along with talented song-writers and enjoy the fellowship of Institute members and guests in the special ambiance of a Victorian House decorated for the season. If you would like to contribute sweets or savories, call Ingrid Head at 967-0754 or Ingrid@worldculture.org
Click here for a printer-friendly flyer to share with friends