Institute of World Culture

Theme for 2019
FREEDOM, EXCELLENCE AND SELF-TRANSCENDENCE

The theme for the year is Freedom, Excellence and Self-Transcendence.  These core ideas point to fundamental potentials in human beings.  Each can be used to develop inner qualities of character in an individual, and each can be used to contribute to the culture of a society.  Together these ideas interact and nourish cultures.  In time, a world culture can emerge from the authentic development and use of these ideas.

All of the 10 Aims in the Declaration of Interdependence will offer seed ideas for the programs, but Aims #2 and #9 will receive particular attention.

Aim 2: 
To renew the universal vision behind the American Dream through authentic affirmations of freedom, excellence and self-transcendence in an ever-evolving Republic of Conscience.

Aim 9: 
To assist in the emergence of men and women of universal culture, capable of continuous growth in non-violence of mind, generosity of heart and harmony of soul.

flying eagle

 

 

Forum
Global Dialogue and Revolutionary Change

Saturday, January 12, 2019
3:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenters: Maurice Bisheff and Jenny Bisheff


In this forum, discussion will highlight the global dialogues at four international conferences whose abstract and concrete aims promoted human dignity, revolutionary change and greater freedom for human choice. These aims pointed to transformations in religion, universal philosophy, basic income programs, development of the commons and non-violence in education. Questions will be encouraged including whether these and many other global dialogues are icebergs covering a hidden revolution in global values and the expression of compassion. The presenters attended these conferences held during 2018, including the World Parliament of Religions held in Toronto with 10,000 participants.

Suggested donation of $2 per person.
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Seminar
Ecstatic Non-Violence in the North-West Frontier of British India,
1930s – 1050s

Saturday, January 26, 2019
2:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Safoora Arbab


In this seminar an original analysis will reveal how Abdul Ghaffar Khan encouraged and led a nonviolent resistance movement, Khudai Khidmatgar (Servants of God) among the Pashtun people. Although Ghaffar Khan was referred to as a “frontier Gandhi”, study of Pashtun literature, especially poetry, shows that the values of this nonviolent movement reflected the local, indigenous codes of conduct in Pashtun tradition and metaphors of Islam. Illustrations of this local source of nonviolent embodiment will be drawn from the Pashto autobiography of Ghani Khan, from the voices of women published in the Pukhtun journal and from the iconic modern poetry of Ghani Khan. This perspective on the Khudai Khidmatgar movement is the subject of Safoora Arbab’s dissertation prepared at UCLA for the Department of Comparative Literature.

Suggested donation of $2 per person.
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Forum
The Origins of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles:
Faith Politics and Religious Leadership

Saturday, February 9, 2019
3:00 – 5:00 pm
Concord Hall, 1407 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara
Presenter: Mario T. Garcia


Professor Garcia, author of a recently published book on Father Luis Olivares, A Biography: Faith Politics and the Origin of the Sanctuary Movement in Los Angeles, will explain the history and evolution of this movement during the 1980s.  As a practitioner of Liberation Theology, Father Olivares, applied his Catholic faith toward the empowerment of the Latino community in Los Angeles and toward aiding Central American refugees and undocumented Mexican immigrants in the sanctuary.

Mario T. Garcia is a distinguished Professor of Chicano Studies and History at UCSB.

Suggested donation of $2 per person.
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